Using starch and baking soda to harvest mechanical energy

Scientists have used a compound made from a starch derivative and baking soda to help convert mechanical energy to electrical energy. The approach, developed by scientists at Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Technology (DGIST), with colleagues in Korea and India, is cost-effective and biocompatible, and can help charge low-energy electronics like...

Mystery of Betelgeuse’s dip in brightness solved

When Betelgeuse, a bright orange star in the constellation of Orion, became visibly darker in late 2019 and early 2020, the astronomy community was puzzled. A team of astronomers have now published new images of the star's surface, taken using the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (ESO's VLT), that...

Broken heart syndrome markers could help identify those at risk

Scientists have identified two key molecules which play a role in the development of Takotsubo syndrome, known as broken heart syndrome. Researchers from Imperial College London found that increased levels of two small molecules that regulate how genes are decoded, called microRNAs, increase the chance of suffering from Takotsubo syndrome....

Astronauts install new rollout solar panels on International Space Station

Astronauts Thomas Pesquet of France and Shane Kimbrough of the United States spacewalked outside the International Space Station on Wednesday as they began the painstaking process of installing new solar panels to boost the orbital outpost's deteriorating power systems. It was the first of several excursions to augment the ISS's...

Tailored laser fields reveal properties of transparent crystals

The surface of a material often has properties that are very different from the properties within the material. For example, a non-conducting crystal, which actually exhibits no magnetism, can show magnetisation restricted to its surface because of the way the atoms are arranged there. These distinct properties at interfaces and...

Microscopy deep learning predicts viral infections

When viruses infect a cell, changes in the cell nucleus occur, and these can be observed through fluorescence microscopy. Using fluoresence images made in live cells, researchers at the University of Zurich have trained an artificial neural network to reliably recognize cells that are infected by adenoviruses or herpes viruses....

Molecule layer aids chemoselective hydrogenation on solid palladium catalysts

Chemical reactions don't always go to plan. Unwanted by-products lead to extra costs and waste resources. Selective catalysts can help, but chemists have to test out large numbers before they find the right fit. Researchers have now investigated, on an atomic level, how to obtain a palladium catalyst for the...

Geochemical study confirms cause of end-Permian mass extinction event

The most severe mass extinction event in the past 540 million years eliminated more than 90 percent of Earth's marine species and 75 percent of terrestrial species. Although scientists had previously hypothesized that the end-Permian mass extinction, which took place 251 million years ago, was triggered by voluminous volcanic eruptions...

Team discovers unexpected quantum behavior in kagome lattice

An international team led by researchers at Princeton University has uncovered a new pattern of ordering of electric charge in a novel superconducting material. The researchers discovered the new type of ordering in a material containing atoms arranged in a peculiar structure known as a kagome lattice. While researchers already...

Stronger together: How protein filaments interact

Just as the skeleton and muscles move the human body and hold its shape, all the cells of the body are stabilized and moved by a cellular skeleton. Unlike the vertebrate skeleton, this cellular skeleton is a very dynamic structure, constantly changing and renewing itself. It consists of different types...